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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 6-11

A prospective clinical study of the flora and early secondary effects after tracheostomy


1 Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Hubli, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Hubli, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Vikram Kemmannu Bhat
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Vidyanagar, Hubli - 580 021, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jlv.JLV_7_19

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Introduction: Tracheostomy patients develop copious secretions from the stoma along with cough after the procedure. However, the morphology of this secretion and the pattern of the flora over a period of time are not studied. Objective: The main objectives are to study the early after-effects of tracheostomy and to study the flora of the tracheal secretion and its impact on the host. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that was undertaken in a tertiary referral public hospital. Sixty patients were categorized into two groups of 30 each, intubated (Group A) and nonintubated (Group B), before tracheostomy. The consistency, quantity, and culture sensitivity of the tracheal secretion and its impact on the lungs were noted on day 2, 30, and 90 after the procedure. Results: The most common after-effect was copious tracheal secretion that was obvious immediately after tracheostomy which, gradually reduced to scanty. The most common organism was Pseudomonas and Klebsiella in intubated and nonintubated patients on day 2 and day 30, respectively. Conclusion: Tracheal secretion was copious and colonized in most of the patients in both the groups in the immediate post tracheostomy period which became scanty and free of colonies by the 3rd month. The organisms had no negative impact on the lower respiratory tract.


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