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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 64-69

Treatment of laryngeal hyperfunction with flow phonation: A pilot study


1 Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Arkansas, Little Rock, AR, USA
2 Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA
3 Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Arkansas; Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA
4 Speech Pathology Program, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Medical Center, Little Rock, AR, USA
5 Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

Correspondence Address:
Gary H McCullough
University of Central Arkansas, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, 201 Donaghey Avenue, Conway, AR 72035
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-9748.106980

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Context: While clinical successes and descriptions have been reported in a few texts, no data exist to define the utility of flow phonation to improve voice quality in patients with laryngeal hyperfunction. Aims: To provide pilot data regarding the utility of three exercises (gargling, cup bubble blowing, and stretch-and-flow) to improve phonatory airflow during voicing in patients with laryngeal hyperfunction. Settings and Design: Outpatient Voice and Swallowing Center in a University Medical Center. Materials and Methods: Participants received five treatment sessions and were evaluated prior to treatment and after each session using a Phonatory Aerodynamic System to measure airflow during voicing tasks. Noise-to-harmonic ratio and perceptual voice measures were also obtained, as was self-perception of voice handicap. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated All increased airflow and decreased laryngeal airway resistance over five sessions. Measures Analysis of Variance. Results: Six participants completed the protocol. All participants decreased self-perception of voice handicap and improved on noise-to-harmonic ratio and perceptual ratings of vocal quality. Conclusions: Data derived on a small sample of patients in an exploratory investigation suggest further research into the use of these three exercises to improve airflow with voicing and improve vocal quality in patients with laryngeal hyperfunction is warranted.


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