Journal of Laryngology and Voice

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 36--39

Taste disturbance following microlaryngoscopic surgery


Urmila Gurung1, Yashashwi Man Anand2 
1 Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal
2 Department of ENT, Patna Medical College and Hospital, Patna, Bihar, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Urmila Gurung
Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, Ganeshman Singh Building, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu
Nepal

Aims: Taste disturbance following microlaryngoscopic surgery (MLS), although reported, is not a commonly discussed complication. This study was conducted to assess the frequency and recovery of taste disturbances following MLS and its relation with operative time. Subjects and Methods: It was a prospective, observation study conducted in a tertiary center. Fifty-nine patients underwent MLS for benign laryngeal lesions between July 2014 and January 2016. Chemogustometry using tastants' sucrose, salt, citric acid, and caffeine was done a day before surgery, on 1st postoperative day (POD) and 3 weeks postoperatively to assess taste disturbance. The tongue compression by laryngoscope during MLS was taken as operative time. SPSS 16.0 for Windows™ was used for statistical analysis. Genderwise taste disturbance and the recovery of taste disturbance from first POD to 3rd postoperative week were analyzed using Yates's Chi-squared test. Mann–Whitney test was used to compare the mean operative time between patients with and without taste disturbance. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Eight out of fifty-nine (13.5%) patients had taste disturbance on first POD. The operative time ranged from 18 to 33 min (mean 21.3 min ± 4.89) in patients with taste disturbance while the time ranged from 10 to 20 min (mean 13.68 ± 2.33) for patients with no taste disturbance; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). At 3 weeks' postoperative follow-up, only two patients (3.2%) had taste disturbance while six recovered. Conclusions: Transient taste disturbance following MLS is likely more so with longer operative time; hence, preoperative discussion about this potential risk is essential.


How to cite this article:
Gurung U, Anand YM. Taste disturbance following microlaryngoscopic surgery.J Laryngol Voice 2018;8:36-39


How to cite this URL:
Gurung U, Anand YM. Taste disturbance following microlaryngoscopic surgery. J Laryngol Voice [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Sep 15 ];8:36-39
Available from: http://www.laryngologyandvoice.org/article.asp?issn=2230-9748;year=2018;volume=8;issue=2;spage=36;epage=39;aulast=Gurung;type=0