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   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
January-June 2019
Volume 9 | Issue 1
Page Nos. 1-44

Online since Thursday, May 14, 2020

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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  

A study of relationship between reflux symptom index and reflux finding score in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux Highly accessed article p. 1
Sachin Nilakhe, Ashok Purohit, Ankitha Puranik
DOI:10.4103/jlv.JLV_6_19  
Background: Diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is considered as a challenge by otorhinolaryngologists. Reflux symptom index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS) are two diagnostic tools which yield in the diagnosis of LPR. The aim of the study was to establish an association between RSI and RFS in patients with LPR. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on 30 patients who were enrolled. RSI score and RFS were obtained as per pro forma. RSI score ≥13 and RFS ≥7 were indicated to be positive for LPR. Results: Of the 30 patients enrolled, males and females were 16 and 14, respectively. Mean RSI score was 23.83 (standard deviation [SD] = 9.07) and mean RFS was 16.07 (SD = 7.31) were obtained. The most common presenting symptom was lump in the throat (80%) and the sign was hyperemia/erythema (83.33%). A strong correlation of 0.86 (P = 0.01) was established between RSI and RFS. Conclusion: LPR plays a key role in patients with laryngeal complaints. RSI and RFS can be implemented easily in the diagnosis of LPR.
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A prospective clinical study of the flora and early secondary effects after tracheostomy p. 6
Vikram Kemmannu Bhat, Roshna Raj Vazhayil Rajan, Shwetha Nagachar, Roopa Sachidananda
DOI:10.4103/jlv.JLV_7_19  
Introduction: Tracheostomy patients develop copious secretions from the stoma along with cough after the procedure. However, the morphology of this secretion and the pattern of the flora over a period of time are not studied. Objective: The main objectives are to study the early after-effects of tracheostomy and to study the flora of the tracheal secretion and its impact on the host. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that was undertaken in a tertiary referral public hospital. Sixty patients were categorized into two groups of 30 each, intubated (Group A) and nonintubated (Group B), before tracheostomy. The consistency, quantity, and culture sensitivity of the tracheal secretion and its impact on the lungs were noted on day 2, 30, and 90 after the procedure. Results: The most common after-effect was copious tracheal secretion that was obvious immediately after tracheostomy which, gradually reduced to scanty. The most common organism was Pseudomonas and Klebsiella in intubated and nonintubated patients on day 2 and day 30, respectively. Conclusion: Tracheal secretion was copious and colonized in most of the patients in both the groups in the immediate post tracheostomy period which became scanty and free of colonies by the 3rd month. The organisms had no negative impact on the lower respiratory tract.
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Outcome of tracheostomy in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation p. 12
Apurva Gupta, Rohit Sharma, Vinit Kumar Sharma, Amit Kumar Rana, Lalit Singh
DOI:10.4103/jlv.JLV_1_20  
Introduction: Acute respiratory failure requiring prolonged intubation is now the most common indication for tracheostomy. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of tracheostomy, total days on ventilator and hospital stay, and ease of decannulation in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with regard to its timings (early versus late) and to compare the comorbidities and mortality in patients of both groups. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 45 critically ill patients who underwent endotracheal intubation followed by a tracheostomy. Results: In the early tracheostomy group (<7 days), the mean number of days of hospital stay was less, and there was a lesser incidence of early postoperative complications and earlier decannulation compared to the late tracheostomy group (>7 days). Early tracheostomy seems to have no benefit with respect to mean number of days on ventilator. Conclusion: Early tracheostomy has a significant positive impact on critically ill ICU patients.
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Phonatory outcome of autologous fat injection in unilateral vocal cord palsy p. 15
Sachin Gandhi, Shashank Gupta, Nilanjan Bhowmick, Nagaraj Maradi, Vrushali Desai
DOI:10.4103/jlv.JLV_9_18  
Objective: Evaluate the outcome of autologous fat injection (AFI) in the management of unilateral vocal cord palsy (UVCP). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we obtained data of all patients with UVCP of at least 6 months duration who underwent AFI. Preoperative and postoperative grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS), voice handicap index (VHI), and multidimensional voice program scores were obtained and compared to evaluate the subjective and objective outcomes of AFI. Results: Sixty patients underwent AFI. There was significant improvement in perceptual voice, as graded by both – patient and observer, using VHI and GRBAS scale. Significant improvement was also seen in Jitter and Soft Phonation Index on voice analysis. Conclusion: AFI is a simple, safe, and cost-effective method with excellent phonatory outcomes for the management of UVCP.
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LETTER TO DELEGATES Top

Letter to delegates p. 20

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284239  
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PRESENTATION WINNERS Top

Congratulations: List of Winners who presented at the Frontiers in Laryngology the inaugral congress of the Asia Pacific Laryngology association p. 22

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284243  
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ABSTRACTS Top

Abstracts accepted for presentation at the Frontiers in Laryngology, 1st-3rd November, Singapore: Oral - Junior Consultant p. 24

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284240  
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Oral - Resident & Post-Graduate p. 27

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284242  
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Oral - Open p. 30

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284241  
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E-Posters p. 32

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284238  
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Video p. 43

DOI:10.4103/2230-9748.284244  
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